The Organised Dancer

There’s no denying that dancers are busy people. Between classes, rehearsals, school and everything else in life, it’s easy to lose track of things. Here are some of my top tools and tricks for keeping yourself organised:

Messy dance gear? Time to get organised!

Messy dance gear? Time to get organised!

General Tips

  • Make a schedule. The great thing about being a dancer is that we work on a pretty routine schedule most of the time, so draw up a schedule of your classes and practices that occur on a regular basis and put it somewhere you’ll see it often.
  • Keep your calendar up-to-date. Whether you use a pen and paper diary,  or the calendar on your phone, make sure all important dates are recorded so you don’t miss a thing – especially when you have rehearsals or assignments that aren’t part of your regular schedule.
  • Sort out your dance bag. If you’re anything like me, you chuck everything in your dance bag. But make time each week to sort out your dance bag so you’re not carrying around unnecessary items.
Fabric packing cells are great for storing padding for pointe shoes or other bits and pieces that travel to and from class in your dance bag.

Fabric packing cells are great for storing padding for pointe shoes or other bits and pieces that travel to and from class in your dance bag.

  • Find a place for everything. Dancers tend to accumulate dance stuff. Organise your dance gear so that everything has a place, and you know where to find it.
  • Plan some down time. It’s great to busy and active, but it can easily become a habit. Planning for some relaxing time each week gives your brain and body a chance to rest.

Dance Gear Storage Tips

Dance gear sorted!

Dance gear sorted! It’s that easy.

  • Choose a basket/drawer or other container that will be your one place all your dance gear is stored. I use woven baskets that are open on top because it lets clothing and shoes breathe better, plus I can see what’s in each basket.
  • Separate your dance clothes based on when you use them. Because I wear the same clothes to teach dance as I do for running or jazz I keep these all together. My leotards and tights, which I only wear for ballet are separate, as are warm ups. It makes it easy to find what you need when you’re in a hurry.
  • Sort other dance related things into containers so they’re easy to find. I have a few different braces for various body parts that sometimes need a bit of extra support, along with therabands, spare ribbons, pointe shoe thread etc. that end up in a jumble if I’m not careful. Making a place for these helps me find them when I need them.
All my ballet shoes in one neat and tidy place - easy to grab when I'm in a hurry.

Store all your ballet shoes in one neat and tidy place – easy to grab when you’re in a hurry.

  • Store your shoes/extra bits and pieces for each class together. I keep all my ballet shoes (2 pairs of pointes, 1 pair of flats) together in a mesh bag along with my ouch pouches and toe tape for pointe. This means I just need to grab one bag every time I have ballet. I don’t every use the shoes separately so there’s no reason they can’t be together.

 

What are your top organisational tips? Share your top tips in the comments below.

The Photo Shoot

I’m pleased to (finally) be able to give you a sneak peak of the photo shoot I had with gorgeous dancer L. about a month ago. While I’m saving most of the images for their accompanying blog posts here are a few of my favourites.

For those wondering, L. is an intermediate level dancer just beginning on pointe. She turns 13 this year. The teacher/older dancer in the photos is me.

Rotating through the whole leg and ensuring the knee is tracking over the second toe is important when working in turn out.

Rotating through the whole leg and ensuring the knee is tracking over the second toe is important when working in turn out.

There's a sort of grotesque beauty to a dancer's feet.

There’s a sort of grotesque beauty to a dancer’s feet.

Helping students to rotate the foot to avoid sickling helps to develop a sense of correct alignment.

Helping students to rotate the foot to avoid sickling develops a sense of correct alignment.

Stretching through the feet is as important in contemporary as in ballet.

Stretching through the feet is as important in contemporary as in ballet.

Brie Jessen-Vaughan

Brie Jessen-Vaughan

Creating a sense of distance through epaulement and eyeline.

Creating a sense of length and longing through epaulement and eyeline.

Supporting dancers to feel correct alignment helps to develop their proprioception of a movement.

Supporting dancers to feel correct alignment helps to develop their proprioception of a movement.

The teacher/mentor relationship is such an important one for dancers of all ages.

The teacher/mentor relationship is such an important one for dancers of all ages.

All photos are taken by Marilyn Jessen and Copyright to dancewell.wordpress.org. Please do not use without DanceWell’s permission.

 

Dancewear

I’m the first to admit it – I love dancewear. I spend a fair bit of time in it each week, so this is probably a bonus.

 

What to wear when dancing is pretty straightforward once you know what you’re doing, but it can be quite daunting for the beginner. What to wear depends on what exactly you are going to be doing. For example, sneakers and loose-fitting clothing allows you to move more freely, which is useful if you are doing hip hop, while a leotard, tights and ballet shoes enable a teacher to see correct technique in a ballet class. These styles have specific rules about what is appropriate, however there are a few general guidelines that are helpful to bear in mind, whether it’s your first class or your 500th class.

  • Expectations Find out what the expectations are for your dance style and then choose clothing you feel comfortable in within these expectations. Your teacher doesn’t want to have to remind you about your dancewear.
  • Differentiate Make sure your dancewear is different to your outwear/everyday clothes. Outdoor clothes are uncomfortable to dance and at best and restrictive to the point of being dangerous (either for your clothes or your person) at worst. Not to mention the fact that you’re going to sweat!
  • Moveability Wear clothes that let you move – whether it’s something loose or tight-fitting lyrca it has to let you move comfortably or easily. You don’t want to be stressing about your clothes instead of focusing on the dance.

Chances are that if you are a student taking classes at a studio, you have a set uniform, but if you taking community classes or dancing at school, it’s important to think about what you’re dancing in as it can have a big impact on how you can dance!

We’ve all got our favourite clothes to dance in – what are yours?