A New Look and a New Focus

Two years ago this blog began as a dance blog, which had grown out of my own personal blog and a desire to write more about dance. A year ago I began the process of starting my own dance studio and the blog became a extension of this. Lately though I’ve been missing the original intention of the blog.

So in light of all this, I’ve decided to separate the two things – The Dance Well Centre is my business, my dance studio and this blog is not about that. This blog is about sharing stories and articles, information and ideas to help you become a better dancer. This is The Dance Well Project.

 

So expect to see more stories, more interviews from dancers, and more articles. If you are interested in writing for The Dance Well Centre, or would like to be interviewed/featured please contact briejessenvaughan @ icloud.com (just take out the spaces).

 

 

Dancer Profile: Ashlee

This week we’re featuring talented young dancer Ashlee Gen.

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Ashlee is 14 years old and a year 10 student in college this year. She has been dancing since she was four years old and currently takes ballet, jazz and contemporary dance at Hayley Johnson Academy of Dance. In her spare time she enjoys baking and playing netball.

What do you love about dance?

I love the feeling of being able to move freely. Also I like how I can express myself without using words. I love the feeling of excitement when performing for people. I love being on a stage, with a beautiful costume on doing what I love.

What challenges you about dance? And how to you move past that?

I find it challenging to learn new dance moves, especially ballet moves as I haven’t been doing ballet for long. I guess practice is the best thing to do. But I don’t practice too much. Otherwise I find that I won’t be able to get it.

Who are your role models, inspirations in dance?

I definitely look up to Sophia Lucia. She holds the world record for the most consecutive pirouettes. I also look up to Kalani Hiliker, Jenna Valezuela and Christina Guieb. Christina dances at Hayley Johnson Academy of Dance and she got accepted into the NZSD Contemporary Programme for 2015. Another dancer I find inspirational is Heather Morris – I just enjoy watching her dance.

What is your favourite style?

I have two. I love lyrical and jazz.

What is your current favourite dance track (music)?

At the moment I like Chandelier by Sia.

Must have item of dance clothing?

Leotard and tights.

If you’d like to be featured on The Dance Well Project, please leave a comment below indicating this, or email briejessenvaughan @ icloud.com (just take the spaces out).

The Organised Teacher

A while ago, I wrote a post on how to stay organised as a dance student, but it’s not just students that need to stay organised – teachers do too! Here are my top tips for keeping on top of things:

  • Stay up-to-date. I use a combination of a diary and the calendar on my iPhone to organise my schedule, which can be a bit crazy at times. It doesn’t matter what you use to do it, as long as you know what’s coming up and what’s on the horizon.
  • Use timesaving tools. I’m a big fan of apps that help me save time.
  • Get the to do list sorted! As dance teachers we always have things on the go and a million different things to keep track of – to do lists are essential! I keep my personal to do list organised through Trello and the school I work for uses DropTask, so I use that for my professional to do lists.
  • Organise your music. Whether it’s playlists on an iPod/MP3 or CDs. Keeping track of the music you need for classes is vital. I have over 4000 songs in my itunes library. I use playlists to organise these into music which might useful for classes and then I create specific playlists through Terpster, an app especially designed for dance teachers.
  • Maintain your social media presence. Admittedly this is something I am not great at, but I am learning to make time for it. Scheduling and dedicating time to maintaining a strong and postive online presence is important in a world where the vast majority of spend time online every day. It’s especially important if you work with young people as this is their world in many ways. Using apps like Hootsuite to schedule posts can help if (like me) you are extremely short on time.
  • Set aside time for yourself. In the busy, wonderful and often chaotic world of performing arts and teaching, this can be hard to do, but that makes it even more important! I use a couple of apps to help me remember to stop throughout the day. The first is Intention Reminder, which lets you set intentions that will pop up and remind you at pre-set times. The second is Buddify, a meditation app that has a huge range of focused meditations or visualisations for all sorts of situations. I also set myself non-work times in the evenings to spend with my family and often use the small window of time before bed to read of practice yoga.

What things do you do to stay organised and on top?

 

 

Safe Stretching

This post is part two of a series on stretching. Check out the first part A Beginner’s Guide to Stretching here, if you missed it.

What is safe stretching?

  • Safe stretching is stretching in a way that is as safe as possible for you and your body.

Why is it so important?

  • It helps to reduce the chance of injury.
  • It can actually help improve your flexibility
  • It places limits to stop you from overdoing it.

How to stretch safely:

  1. Warm up properly first with 10 – 20mins of cardio. This could include briskly walking, running, skipping or other movement that get your heart beating faster. From an anatomical point of view, cardio increases your body temperature, thus warming up your muscles and making them more flexible. Cold muscles don’t like to stretch!
  2. Start gently. Don’t throw yourself into splits straight away, do some hip-opening stretches or hamstring stretches to engage the muscles first. Whatever your planning to work on in your stretching session, start slowly as your muscles are still warming up.
  3. Know your limits and don’t force it. If you are sore from a class earlier in the week, then keep that in mind and work to your limits. Similarly if you are recovering from an injury don’t push yourself too hard.
  4. Be realistic. Change (unfortunately) doesn’t happen overnight however much we want to! Progress happens day by day and I know from experience that you do yourself no favours by having unrealistic expectations.
  5. Don’t overstretch. Overstretching is when you stretch for longer or further than your body can realistically handle. This could be sitting in splits for 10+ minutes while watching TV or stretching for long periods of time more than once a day. Either way it’s not good and it dramatically increases your chance of injury. Did you know that 60% of dance injuries occur as a result of overuse (DANZ, 2006)?
  6. Monitor your energy level. If you are already exhausted your more likely to injure yourself. 90% of dance injuries occur when a dancer is fatigued (DANZ, 2006). If you’re shattered after a tough class or a long day, skip the stretching and relax. You’ll be doing your body a favour.
  7. Stretching shouldn’t be painful. A stretch? Yes. Not comfortable? Definitely. Sore Afterwards? Possibly. Actually painful? No! Pain means you’re pushing yourself too hard and increasing the risk of injury. If you do injure yourself apply the dancer’s first aid strategy PRICED immediately.
  8. Feed yourself. So important. Using your muscles takes energy from your body and muscles and you need to replace it help them stay strong, so make sure you eat something within 40 minutes of stretching. It doesn’t have to be much, but something with protein and carbohydrates is perfect.

Happy stretching!

A Beginner’s Guide to Stretching

Stretching.

We all know it’s important but there is so much mis-information out there about it, that’s can be really hard to know where to start.

The tips below are perfect for beginners new to stretching, and a great reminder for the rest of us too!

Stretching is an important part of any dancers' training, but it's important it's done carefully.

Stretching is an important part of any dancers’ training, but it’s important it’s done carefully.

So you want to become more flexible? Well there are few important things you need to know:

  • Improving your flexibility is a journey not a destination. While it’s easy to focus on the end result (for example middle splits), we can often end up overlooking how much progress we’ve made as we work towards our goal. One way to see how you are progressing is to take photos every week or two so you can see the change.
  • Choose one goal at a time. It’s tempting to list everything you want to improve, but it doesn’t make it any easier! Choose one thing to work on, focus on that, and when you feel like you’ve made progress on that move on to the next goal.
  • Usual visual cues to help you achieve your goal. This might be a picture of what you’d like to be able to to do, or a post it note on your mirror. Use it as a reminder of what you’re aiming for and also a reminder to stretch.
  • Celebrate your successes. When you achieve a goal, doing something small to celebrate it and be proud that you’ve managed to work hard to achieve it!
  • Be patient, change takes time. Forcing your self to do something your body isn’t ready to do puts you at risk for an injury. Injuries aren’t fun and they can set you back in progress to achieve your goal, so don’t risk it.
  • Practice safe stretching. This means warming up properly, and not overstretching. If you’re a beginner consider taking a stretch or conditioning class for dancers until you feel confident.

What are your top tips for stretching?

Watch out for part two of our stretching series coming soon – Safe Stretching.